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HeliTorque :: View topic - what should a professional resume look like?
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HeliTorque Forum Index » Employment

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what should a professional resume look like? Goto page Previous  1, 2
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raffski
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paco wrote:
A bit of market research - I'm thinking of adding the CPL exam material to the heli handbook, so it becomes a true reference book for helicopter pilots throughout their career. Or would it be better to do a separate book?

Phil


Depends on what you mean. I think it works quite well stand alone as it's quite concise, adding the CPL material may add a section that might not get referred to much after you passed the exams. However depending on how it was done it might be a useful refresher.
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SuperF
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2006 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

one word "professional"

sorry don't know what that is Laughing

seriously tho paco had it right. one page that covers the lot. other detail further through if we want to find it, or if you get a second chance.

Please please please, put your hours in. don't worry if you don't think that you have enough, or the right type etc, but sometimes hours are important for insurance companies etc. Operators like to have an idea of how much work they are going to have to put into you before they can get productivity out of you. It may be a little or a lot, but to begin with you WILL cost money, and that has to be factored in. if your hours aren't mentioned you will probably be put in file 13.

Also a brief run down of experience, if you are a fresh CPL then simply school and 150 hrs R22, or whatever it is. don't worry about what your training experience involved, as within each country the training is similar, with a varience, and preconcieved ideas that each operator will have about the individual schools.

Even up to 500 maybe 1000 hours, be brief about your experience on the front page, in fact with any experience a brief rundown of hours with a better breakdown elsewhere is the way to go. Sometimes the operator needs 1500, or 2500 hrs before they will consider you, so it doesn't matter how good you are if you don't have the required experience you won't get hired.

throw your resume in tho, as they may be looking for someone else to fill a position, they may hire internally, and need to fill that position.
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3top
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey PACO,

any chance you could post a sample CV (a "long" one)?
All the tips are appreciated, but nothing beats the real sample Wink

One other question to all:
How do you see the chance to get part of a license sponsored in exchange for a bond!
Specifically: I have over 8K hours in different environments, piston and turbine (over 1400 hrs), but never did/needed the IFR.
Now I would like to move on, but IFR is bloody expensive by now!
I did the Fixed Wing-IFR some 14 years ago, but never actually used it.
I will have to start from scratch, planning to do as much as possible on a PC-sim - at least it is good enough to get procedures hammered into the subconcsious.
Having the Fixed-IFR, I only need to do 15 hrs in a helo to add the Rotary-IFR.
But it is still too much ($) at the moment - US-FAA is good enough...

Any hints appreciated!

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Snakedriver
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2006 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Use the Resume Wizard on your Computer.. Works good, besides few are ever hired off of Resumes.
In the states if its over one page, its boring and full of non-essential info......
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3top
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2006 12:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanx Snake,

at this time I really don't need it anymore. It will only be a piece of paper to have all my data in one place for my future employer.
The deal is pretty much done, the resume is for the archive.

However don't forget one thing:

Although the Resume doesn't get you hired, it DOES get you the Interview (... or not!! depending on the resume, unfortunately...)

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Dallas2881
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 2:08 am    Post subject: Brian Hudson Reply with quote

Try Brian Hudson's Website, it is very informative and it has some examples and the payscale tools are a must.

http://brian.hudson.home.mchsi.com

Spinny side up,

Dallas
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Heli-Ops
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One thing to remember is that you only get ONE opportunity to make a FIRST impression, whether that is on the phone, via sending your resume in or in person so dont blow it.
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SARman
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My advice is take Reddog's advice!

I'd also add as a couple of hints that you do as much research as you can into the company you are applying to first, then pick up the telephone and ask the receptionist the name of the Chief Pilot, or person you need to speak to regarding Commercial Pilot employment. When you have the details you need, say thank you very much, you've been most helpful, and hang up. (Resumes sent "to whom it may concern" are very poor in today's easy commerce world!) When you phone back the next day, ask for the person by name now, and you're half way in. If they are out, leave a message with your name, credentials, request and contact details - clearly stating that you will call back rather than asking them to call you. He/she has got your details and will call you if they are worth their salt, even if it's to say no.

If they don't phone you in 24 hours, phone back. Keep phoning, but don't be a pest! When you get to speak with them, ask if you can call in for five minutes to introduce yourself as you'll be in the area for a few days and...

When you are physically through the front door and sat in front of the Chief Pilot, even if you've just called in for a chat and not a formal interview, now's the time for your resume to land on his/her desk (unless you're applying for a job internationally.) A one page, four paragraph cover letter and a one page, easy to read resume is all that is needed. Details of flying experience are paramount, even if all you've done is take your CPL. Other work is still important but secondary, so don't dwell on it too much, but do highlight what skills and experiences cross reference easily.

I have found that during visits or interviews that wearing what their pilot's wear is always the best choice of clothing. No point in wearing a trendy suit if you're going for an ag job, or an untucked, open-necked shirt and jeans if you'll be SIC in an S-76!

Good luck. Remember that no, no, no, no, no eventually adds up to make yes!
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