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HeliTorque Forum Index » Instructor Forum

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Bierbuikje
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2005 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a governor failure in an R44 a few years ago, a RPM run up had to turn off the governor and complete the flight with manual throttle, so it can happen.

I also had the governor roll down on me which required me to enter autorotation, this was caused by flying past a large radio transmitter (The radio signal can interfere with the governor) When ever I fly past a radio transmitter now I always turn the governor off.

I think all emergency situations should be taught before solo but to a pre solo standard, as flight training continues the student???s standard in theses procedures should improve up to flight test standard.
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rotrhd1
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2005 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bierbuikje wrote:
I had a governor failure in an R44 a few years ago, a RPM run up had to turn off the governor and complete the flight with manual throttle, so it can happen.

I also had the governor roll down on me which required me to enter autorotation, this was caused by flying past a large radio transmitter (The radio signal can interfere with the governor) When ever I fly past a radio transmitter now I always turn the governor off.

I think all emergency situations should be taught before solo but to a pre solo standard, as flight training continues the student???s standard in theses procedures should improve up to flight test standard.


Wow. I've flown by and even landed at the base of some radio towers and never had a problem with the Gov. Good thing to keep in mind.

So back to the stuck pedal exercise...

I don't think a complete lesson is possilbe... no drawings available and all... but I'll try to briefly describe in a couple of posts.

In the hover is where it first gets introduced. After the ground instruction, we'll just experiment with freezing the pedals at hover power, with a slight left yaw and slight right yaw. This is done over a taxi way or other smooth, "slippery" surface.

The catch-phrase I use is: "Left - lift and roll, right just roll"

If the machine is rotating left, raise the collective and reduce throttle slowly and gradually but at the same time. Eventually the aircraft will stop rotating left, then allow it to settle to the ground. If the aircraft is rotating to the left and the hover is quite high, decreasing height will reduce the rotation. If there's still some left yaw proceed as above.

If the machine is rotating right, reduce the collective until the rotation stops but DO NOT raise the collective to cushion the touch down. If the collective is used the rotation will be to the right.

RH1
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Bierbuikje
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2005 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rotrhd 1

In regard to the governor and radio towers, it only occurs in some frequency ranges (I think very low frequencies but I'm not 100% sure) There is something in the safety notices in the Robinson R22 & R44 POH.

When it happened to us we started to here music through the headsets from the transmission towers. I know another pilot who was flying in a Lynx past the same towers; he had some small problems with interference to electrical systems on his aircraft.

The problem is as you fly past a tower youv'e never flown past before you never know if it will interfere with the governor.
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rotrhd1
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I thought there'd be a couple of other replies to this thread by now....

After the hover introduction we'll get into a stuck pedal scenario from cruise flight.

In cruise, it usually equals out to having the pedal stuck at about 18" MAP. Not enough to hover without some right rotation (estimating hover power to be around 22" MAP)

Where ever the pedal is "stuck" at, we set up the approach so the nose is no more that 30?? to the left of center, and orient the approach with the wind at the 10-11 o'clock position. Setting up like this yields a relatively flat approach angle.

We fly the approach normally, making sure not to slow down too much until we're sure we'll make the landing area, usually the runway, but anywhere there's a large, flat, smooth area.

As the last of the airspeed is reduced gradually and the collective is raised to flatten the approach angle, the nose starts to straighten out. When the nose is straight, the throttle is reduced gradually. We keep slowing down, raising collective and reducing throttle until ground contact is made.

My little "ditty" again is "Left lift, right roll". Meaning: if the nose is left of straight, lift the collective. If it's right of straight, roll throttle off slightly - and it won't take much.

It's a good coordination exercise and the touchdown can be performed quite smoothly with very little ground speed at touchdown.
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helos4me
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2005 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, just a bit late on the thread but for what it's worth, I think training for stuck pedals is vital. The way I teach recovery (ie: landing) is to extend the index finger of my collective (throttle) hand and gently roll the throttle (finger) in the direction I want the nose to follow.

My approach to instructing EP's is if you can think up the scenario, you should train for the recovery/appropriate actions. If nothing else, it makes you use that sponge between your ears, and as rotrhd1 said makes for some great coordination exercises.

Safe flight
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Hughes500
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No one in the Uk should follow the JAA sylabus word for word. after all Lesson 16 EOL's is done after first solo - I will leave the obvious here !!
All emergencies from stuck pedals, doors poping, tailrotor problems, engine failures / engine misbehaving should be taught by instructors/ talked about as an ongoing process. Personally my students will do an EOL or similar at the end of every trip. You only need to close the throttle once in a hover for the student to hover taxi at a height he would be happy to jump out of the machine !! For instance
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malone
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfortunately, nothing is simple. I used to teach engine failures in the hover from an altitude of about two feet
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Hughes500
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I along with lots of other instructor / examiners think it is wrong not to teach EOL's to the ground. The R22 was never designed as a teaching machine, therefore due to the high accident rate of R22's in EOL's the CAA removes EOL's from the sylabus - removing yet another area of safety. Personally an auto to a flare recovery is more likely to cause damage to your engine than a full touchdown EOL. Actually full touchdown EOL's are easier to perform ! But most importantly they give the student utter confidence in the machine. All my current students going through courses ( 8)have all been given the option of power recovery or touchdown - all want to be able to perform touchdown autos and regulaly practisce them.
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haggishunter
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
One thing I noticed about that was when you feel the heli start to vibrate, then you get a sense of flying backwards, and then you see the strings actually flop down as if there's no wind anymore, you know something's not quite right!


The R22 and R44's ASI over-reads quite abit in high rates of descent. The feelings of going backwards is because you probably are. A 40kias constant attitude auto will proobably be about 25ktas.

Just a thought.
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