Welcome Guest
HeliTorque
  
User Control Panel

Security Code: : Security Code
Type Security Code Here: :
 
Register Here
Lost Password?

Online Stats:
Visitors: 36
Members: 0
Total: 36

Membership:
New Today: 0
New Yesterday: 0
Registering: 0
Members: 6662
Latest: chrisw

Most Ever Online
Visitors: 447
Members: 10
Total: 457


HeliTorque :: View topic - PPL(H) Diary
Forum FAQ
Forum FAQ
Search
Search
Memberlist
Memberlist
Usergroups
Usergroups
Profile
Profile
Contact Manager
Contact Manager
Log in
Log in
Log in to check your private messages
Log in to check your private messages
HeliTorque Forum Index » Student Pilots & Hour Builders

Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT
PPL(H) Diary Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saturday 14th May 2011

I am booked in for a lesson with Mark Cowley out of Denham this morning and the 8am weather is beautiful although I know the forecast is for winds to pick up and some rain to come through around lunchtime.

Mark hadn't been able to find my records (they are over at Wycombe) so I tell him where I am at with 41hours done, 0.6 left to do on Instruments and 2.1 on solo. He suggests we get the instrument work done first and then look for me to get in some solo if the winds are holding off.

He goes through with me all the teaching elements that are required for the PPL instrument appreciation and I confirm that I have covered all of the required elements so this will be a revision lesson to just hone my skills.

After lift and a check to ensure that all the insturments are working as they should I depart and immediately hand over controls so that I can put on the foggles. I fly us out of the circuit and out west gaining some altitude before leveling off at 2000ft. We do some rate 1 turns to the left and the right and then a rate 1 180 degree turn which I do without changing altitude by more than 50ft which is better than required for the PPL(h) skills test to come in a couple of months or so.

We do a bit of climbing and descending and Mark says that he is very happy with my flying. I comment that I had done 2 hours last week which has helped as I havent lost and of the skill level that I had reached last week.

We head back to Denham and I fly us down to the circuit before removing the foggles for the final approach and return to HeliAir. A total 0.8 flight with 0.7 on instruments taking me over the 5 hour requirement.

Total 42.2 hours
Solo 7.9 hours of which 5.9 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law.

We grab a cup of tea and check the weather with the winds now holding steady around the 11-12 knots level. Mark suggests I go out and do some solo circuit work and some hovering and lift/lands and suggests that the wind levels will give me a bit of a challenge but still within the 15kt limits set by HeliAir for student solo flying.

I head out to G-WINR and start up and lift into the hover which is a little bit wobbly on the actual lift as the aircraft feels a lot lighter without Mark sitting next to me. I make the necessary corrections and steady the hover before heading out for the first of 5 circuits. I am concentrating on the final approach phase as the wind picks up through the flight to 13-15kts and I have to be careful on the transition into the hover turning to 300 degrees at the final stage to face into wind rather than just following the runway (24) along. Each time I head back to the start of the runway concentrating hard on keeping the aircraft straight with a difficult downwind/crosswind but I have it well under control.

After the fifth circuit I do a bit of hovering practice including some sideways to either side which are all fine. I do 3 land and lifts on the grass and these are nicely under control as well. I check down at the fuel which is showing about 4 gallons remaining and glance down at the datcon to see I have done slightly over 0.6 so far. I fly slowly over to heliair and land nicely in front of the hanger before shutting down for a total solo flight of 0.7 leaving me 1.4 left to do to reach the required 10 hours total.

After the flight Mark debriefs me and says he is very pleased with my flying. He said I was very diligent (getting out the POH for the checklists as there was no small checklist to hand) and with thorough radio work and regular checks for ts and ps, carb heat and warning lights as well as ensuring the tail had clearance before turns etc. My flying had been very accurate today which was good as the winds were a bit challenging.

Next lesson is next Saturday 21st from 9am to 11am with Pete out of Denham. Hopefully I can get the 1.5 hours solo finished done then and I will take the meteorology and maybe the navigation exam as well next week.

Total 42.9 hours
Solo 8.6 hours of which 5.9 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sunday 29th May 2011

I arrive at 12.30pm for my 1.30pm lesson with Pete at Wycombe as I want to get my Met and Nav exams out of the way.

Micheal greets me and tells me he is glad I am in early as Pete has set me a practice of the navigation part of the skill test. Michael shows me to the office where my task is on the board. I have to choose a departure point and fly to a suitable turning point of my choosing to switch onto a 1:50000 OS map to locate a farm that Pete has given me the co-ordinates for. I am then to fly to another turning point where I then have to pick up a VOR track and then finally be given an alternate aerodrome/heli site to which I should fly.

The farm details and turning point 2 are given to me as well as the VOR and the radial i am to track to. I am not given the alternate though which will be presented at that point of the flight.

I prepare the flight, check the weather and get the 2000ft wind speed and direction, check notams and then mark out my flight plan on the map. In pencil I draw on the track I will fly to the farm for that part of the flight. I work out my magnetic headings on the flight computer and work out distance and time expectation for my planned 80Kts IAS.

As this is effectively a practice exam for the skills test and could be used by an examiner as the actual test route from Wycombe I am not going to go through the flight in detail. What I will discuss instead were some of my errors although Pete was happy overall with the practice test and felt it was good enough for a pass. Woohoo !! (I informed him after that I hadn't flown in the area that was used for the second half of the practice test and so had no local knowledge to fall back on and in particular I had no knowledge of the alternate site or the route towards it so I was relying completely on map reading with DI and stop watch).

So then onto the faults. I wasnt happy with my speed and altitude control and on a few occasions was outside of the tolerances usually set for the test. We were flying in air a few hours ahead of a cold front with 15-20Kts gusting to 25-30Kts so Pete says some allowance was made for this. I would want to get this more accurate though for when I actually do the test. Of course as soon as you are overloaded with map reading and holding a course your flying accuracy can be quick to go so it needs to be checked constantly.

Onto the other errors/lessons learned:-

I need to prep myself for giving the safety briefing for my passenger.

Immediately pre lift I need to vocalise the checks and again immediately after lift. I did do them but didnt vocalise. My first vocalise was over at training area November. Similarly I vocalised the checks after departure (as crossed the airfield boundary) but didnt vocalise them again till after I had found the farm.

On the first leg I shouldnt make allowance for actual drift till the halfway point. I could tell I was off due to stronger wind and wanted to make a change to allow for this earlier. This part of the test is supposed to represent a relatively featureless terrain that would not enable an early change till half way point. The examiner is after testing my ability to fly a heading and then assess deviation at a set point. fair enough.

At my planned "departure point" I wasnt quite at my planned altitude or airspeed. I vocalised this and vocalised an allowance for this but i should try and get over my DP with correct altitude and speed if at all possible.

This was the first time I had navigated with an OS map. The reality of the scale is that where on a 250k map you would expect to be quite a bit to the left of a given object on a 50k map you arent as nearly as far away as you expect. I knew I had to be to the left of some electricity pylons but it was only a few hundred yards to the left, not the bigger distance I was expecting.

I found the farm no problem. The OS map is so accurate that its not difficult to know which farm is which. I flew over the farm and then turned and set course for next point over the farm. This was new ground for me but I found the location no problem after only 5/6mins flying time (with strong wind behind).

I picked up the required VOR track but I let the needle drift off to the left a bit (due to the strong wind affecting me). Need to concentrate on keeping on the radial a bit more. To be fair this was a new area to me and I was concerned with ensuring I knew exactly where I was and we werent far from some controlled airspace that I wanted to ensure I didnt get close to. In ensuring I knew where I was on the map I let the VOR drift a bit but not too bad.

At one point we were flying quite close to controlled airspace and I could (if I was being clever) had set the squark and changed to the listening frequency which would have given extra brownie points.

I found the alternate no problem although flying into wind I didnt allow for this enough in my announced planned time to the site. Within limits though.

On return to Wycombe Pete wasnt happy with my final approach which was close to some fixed wing aircraft parked on the ground. I wanted to maximise my ground area for an into wind approach which is why i used the approach I did but understand his point.

Following the lesson I sit the Met exam. I get question 1 and 3 wrong and its not looking good but I get the next 17 correct and pass with 18/20 (90%).

I then sit the navigation exam which is actually a pretty difficult exam in my opinion and there are so many different areas you can make mistakes on. I get 3 wrong for 22/25 (88%) so all good.

i discuss with Michael the two exams I have left to do and whether there are any practice exams I can do etc. He tells me that I have to get up to speed with Wagtendock and then just "take the exam blind" so will try and do that in the coming couple of weeks.

Total 43.9 hours
Solo 8.6 hours of which 5.9 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law, Meteorology, Navigation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2011 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have two exams left to take which seem to be Helicopter theory (Wagtendonk) and some exam on planning and performance.

If anyone can give me a decent insight into what exactly is required for these exams that would be appreciated. I am working my way through Wagtendonk which is fine but am interested to know the depth of knowledge required for PPL as I understand Wagtendonk is suffient for CPL(h).

Similary on the Planning and performance if anyone has any tips or info that could be useful for preparation that would be good.

Michael at HeliAir said that most pilots read Wagtendonk and then take a flyer at the exam and pass with flying colours but I prefer to feel a bit more prepared if at all possible Smile

Cheers

Geoff
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
niho
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: May 20, 2009
Posts: 93
Location: Notts UK


uk.gif

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2011 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its hard to describe the level - personally I found looking at sample questions (I used http://www.airquiz.com/ and thought it was pretty good, especially for the price, but there are others) really useful at showing you the type of questions you'll get and the level you're expected to know...

Good luck
_________________
Nick
-----
PPL(H) R22 - ~100 hours
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DBChopper
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Apr 27, 2005
Posts: 518
Location: SE England


uk.gif

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2011 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MintedMav - if you've not done so then I'd recommend buying Geoff Day's new book Helicopter Aerodynamics Made Simple which has a banner advert on this forum. It is very well written and illustrated and says in 20 words what Wonkydag says in 2000.

I'm not saying that is necessarily a bad book, but having ploughed through every last word for the CPL(H) writtens it is a bit of a brain-melter, and there are better tomes about.
_________________
DBChopper

CPL(H) finally!
R22 R44
Redhill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks DB.

I am getting on ok with Wagtendonk but have ordered the book you suggest as there is no such thing as too much information.

Cheers

Geoff
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DBChopper
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Apr 27, 2005
Posts: 518
Location: SE England


uk.gif

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No problem. The nice thing about Geoff's book is the way he constructs the vector diagram from scratch in the first chapter - it makes it very simple to understand and as a result when he returns to it in other chapters it all makes sense.

Good luck with the exams.
_________________
DBChopper

CPL(H) finally!
R22 R44
Redhill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sat 4th June 2011

I am booked in with Mark Walters out of Wycombe for a 9am to 12pm lesson.

On arrival Mark asks how I am doing and I bring him up to speed on where I am in the course and what I have left to do. He has a quick read of my file which doesnt tell him any more than I have already told him which is that I want to do general handling work to get to the point where he is happy to put me forward for test. In particular I want to do some more confined work and PFLs (to the ground preferably) and some on airfield handling work to which he agrees.

We go through a quick briefing of the confined area power required elements and he then talks me through the actual confined area we will be using which is a trick approach over trees to a farm with wires running down the left hand side. We discuss the two approaches in and discuss the risks with a downwind approach and vortex ring problems due to the low airspeed. He tells me of a couple of incidents that have caught out relatively new pilots coming into confined landing sites which are timely reminders.

We also have a quick discussion on emergency procedures and he is happy I know my stuff on this. In particular we discuss the tail rotor failure drill and I outline my plan for a run on landing autorotation with the engine power firmly overridden with thumb down on the collective. Mark tells me of another powered recovery which uses power changes to keep the nose straight from a very shallow approach angle but this sounds riddled with problems so I will revert to the auto landing I think if it ever did happen to me.

I fly us out of Wycombe and we head over to the confined area farm which is only a couple of minutes west of the Wycombe ATZ. We did a power check in the hover at Wycombe which suggested we wouldnt have full vertical performance and a 53kts S+L check shows a power required of 19inches leaving us between 4 and 5 inches available which isnt enough for full vertical performance and wouldnt get us into (and back out of) the really tricky confined section we have planned.

For the first approach we are going to use the larger landing area to the west of the farm building rather than the very confined garden described in the brief which is the other side of the farmhouse and looks extremely tight from where I am looking.

Anyway approach into the farm goes well right till the very last 15-20ft where I bleed off too much speed. Mark reminds me I have to fly the airspeed of at least 30kts all the way to the landing point to ensure translational lift especially given our relatively low power margins.

He takes over and flies us round to position for final approach to show me what he wants and I then have another go which goes much better. Round again for a 3rd attempt and this one goes well also although I could still keep the speed on a bit longer.

I land and we discuss sloped landings quickly before positioning to a slope for some practice. Landing nose towards the slope I make a good job of the landing and take off which I do couple of times. Mark repositions us over to a much steeper part of the field and tells me he thinks this is probably close to the limit of the slope you can land a 22 on. I put it down and very gently lower the aircraft making sure that we dont start to slide backwards. Its a long way down till the skid is fully on the ground and the cyclic is way out in front of me but we are down. I reverse to lift and make a good job of this. Back down and 2nd effort isnt quite as neat as the first although still perfectly acceptable. I lift back up which again isnt quite as neat as it could have been. Mark shows me exactly how to balance on the front of the skids to feel for the horizontal point for take off as I was a bit abrupt. i have a go and its a pretty good effort although still not quite as good as my first go. Anyway its safe and controlled and the slope is way more than I would ever want to try and land on so all good.

We reposition back to the landing circle and check the power again. We have burnt off a bit of fuel now and we check to see if we can climb vertically which we can albeit it a little slowly. Mark is satisfied this is enough to get us into the more confined garden on the other side of the farm.

I circle the farm at 600ft AGL taking a good look at the approach path in and in particular the position of the wires on the left hand side (as we come in) and the line of the trees. There is a gap between two high trees which takes you in over some lower trees. There is a crosswind from the right to deal with on this route in and it looks tight to say the least.

i circle round again and make the approach but am coming in too steep. Mark suggests that he demonstrates so I can see exactly what is required and he brings it in beautifully in between and over the trees with nose pointing off into wind and a good airspeed before making the final left drift onto the grass area to the right of the wires. Very impressive flying. The route out is a towering take off through the avoid curve and out over the trees as soon as possible which I do no problem.

I make the approach this time and do a better job although again I have a tendency to lose speed as I come in over the trees which isnt good. I pick the speed back up and do make it down onto the grass via a hover OGE which we just have enough power for. Mark shows me the approach again and I then make two further approaches both of which are better and I get us in with a safer airspeed down to the ground. Mark tells me it is all about "inertia" management which I am starting to understand. It just feels weird coming into such a tight spot at 30kts+ airspeed.

Back to the airfield and we do a practice auto from 2000ft down to 700ft so Mark could check my entry and rotor control on the descent. He tells me that he will say "practice engine failure GO" and then cut the power and I am to immediately put us into autorotation. It goes fine with a nice entry and I stabilise the rotors well for a controlled descent down to 700ft where we make a powered recovery.

Out to the airfield and we do the same from 700ft with the plan to auto down to the ground. The entry is nice but I flare a bit too hard at the start of the ground flare which would have oversped the rotors... Mark checked this with a collective lift which gave us a "balloon" for a second before we continued down tightening the flare again at the ground before levelling off and then pulling collective for a short run on landing. We talk through the "balloon" and mark explains what he had done so all good as I wasnt sure why it had happened. He also said he had helped a tiny bit on the peddles to ensure we were straight so I should try and work them a bit harder next time.

Round we go again and nice entry in and this time I am more smooth with the flare over the ground. Mark wants me to tighten the flare more at the very end before levelling out to bleed off as much airspeed as possible before levelling out for the ground run. Its not a bad effort though.

Round again this time and its much better all round and I get us down to the ground without any help.

Next time round and this time I bring us in faster (70kts) so there is a much longer run on but the flare and landing were still good.

We do one more at 60Kts and Mark is happy that I have more than met the standard required and that I would be able to get the aircraft down reasonably intact to the ground (maybe with a rotor overspeed in the final flare but in an emergency that would be the least of my worries).

We do a couple of quick stops and a bit of hovering in cross winds (blowing 12-15kts) before heading back to HeliAir.

Mark tells me that he is happy to put me forward for the skills test. I advise that I still need to get the last 2 exams out of the way which I will do next weekend and that I have to get 1.4 hours of solo done as well which we will look to get done next weekend also. We will also do a full practice test next weekend just to make sure I have everything covered off before the day.

Friday 10th June update... The test is booked for Friday 24th June... so I better pass the exams next weekend and I will get the solo out of the way during a weekday if the weather isnt suitable next weekend so that the course is completed before test day. I have flown with all the authorised examiners at HeliAir so the test will be conducted by Leon Smith from Helicopter Services at Wycombe who is their chief instructor.

All very exciting Smile

Total 45.3 hours
Solo 8.6 hours of which 5.9 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law, Meteorology, Navigation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2011 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sat 11th June 2011

I have a morning lesson with Mark Walters and I arrive with reasonable conditions and critically a wind of only 5-8kts. I suggest to Mark I focus on getting the final 1.4 hours of solo done and he agrees this is a good plan. I start to plan for a cross country down towards the basingstoke area but a check of the TAFs show the weather isnt so good that way. We agree instead I will go and familiarise myself a lot more with the area in between Wycombe and Denham and up to Lutons airspace as this is likely to be the area that the test will be conducted in.

I A-check the aircraft and we fill the main tank and then I do a weight and balance for practice. We check notams and there is some restricted airspace at 1pm over Denham for the Queens Birthday fly pass but i will be back down well before this.

Out of the circuit I fly up to Bovingdon, along to the south and west of Luton past Cheddington and Halton, along and past Aylesbury before turning back flying to the North of Wycombe and back to Denham via Amersham. Back at Denham I do 4 or 5 circuits practicing a nice clean final approach and transition back to the hover.

In between circuits I do a couple of landings and lifts and concentrate on my downwind hover taxying not overworking the pedals.

After the circuits I have 0.2 left to do and so do some hovering in the hover circle, some spot turns and then some landings crosswind and downwind for practice. I then do one last circuit before returning back to heli air for a total solo time of 1.5 hours.

Back in I briefly chat through the flight with Mark but no issues to raise. I ask if I can do the Helicopter General and principles of flight exam which is a big one 40 questions. I get it done in about 25 minutes and get 33 out of 40 (82%) which I was quite happy with as there are no practice exams you can do for this so it was being taken "blind" compared to how prepared I was for other exams. I made a couple of silly mistakes due to not properly understanding how a question was being worded and there were two or three that I didnt know but nothing major.

Given this success and the fact its still only 12 (my lesson is booked till 1pm) I ask to sit the flight planning and performance exam as well and I get 16 out of 20 on this one (80%). Again I had taken this exam blind so I was quite pleased to get the pass. 1 very silly mistake, 1 misread of a question, 1 where there were two equally valid answers and 1 I plain didnt know.

So that is all the passes complete. Mark goes through my log book with me to check that all the necessary solo, solo nav, instrument time, total time and all the exercises are complete which they are.

I have a lesson booked with Mark at Wycombe tomorrow afternoon so we will do a full practice test. I go through 5 or 6 things that i would like a refresher on which we will do and we will do 10-15 minutes on instruments also just to check I have the required level for the test.

After the lesson I head on down to Popham for a refresher on the fixed wing microlight. We do a PFL, a couple of steeper turns and then 4 or 5 circuits which go ok although its very "bumpy" which you really notice in a fixed wing - helicopters just cut through all this sort of air so its a bit of a surprise going back. At the end of the lesson I have pretty much decided that trying to keep both helicopters and fixed wings going is going to be spreading myself too thin so I will almost certainly drop the fixed wing and just concentrate on helicopter flying going forward. Its just so much more fun!!!

Total 46.8 hours
Solo 10.1 hours of which 7.4 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law, Meteorology, Navigation, Helicopter general and principles of flight, flight performance and planning.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Friday 24th June 2011

So the day arrived for my PPL(h) skills test and.... to cut a long story short.... I PASSED WOOHOOO.

Its an exam so I am not going to go into the detail of the 1.7 hours that it took to complete the test other than to say the weather gods smiled on me having predicted rain 5 days ago with beautiful blue skies, occasional cloud around 4000ft and a 10kt wind at 2000ft.

Forms have all been completed and a cheque written to the CAA so hopefully I should have my licence back in the next 3 or 4 weeks.

A big thanks to all the instructors who taught me throughout the course and made it an incredible experience but in particular to Pete Rafferty, Jonathan Penny, Simon Browne and Mark Walters Smile

Now onto the R44 conversion....

Total 46.8 hours plus 1.7 PPL Skills test
Solo 10.1 hours of which 7.4 hrs solo nav including q.x.country.
Instruments 5.1 hours
Exams passed - FRTOL practical and written, HPL, Air Law, Meteorology, Navigation, Helicopter general and principles of flight, flight performance and planning, PPL(h) Skills Test.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
uniformkilo
Starting to 'Torque
Starting to 'Torque


Offline
Joined: Dec 20, 2005
Posts: 31
Location: Cambridge, UK


uk.gif

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations, and thanks for posting it all in such brave detail. Have really enjoyed reading all about it.

Tim
_________________
Tim
http://www.timgilbert.com

+44 7725 750103

CPL(H), FI(H)(R) R22 R44 206, offering trial lessons and PPL(H) courses at Aeromega in Cambridge. Experienced safety pilot for heli-trips for current and rated pilots looking for adventure.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tim,

Thanks for the congrats Smile

Just taken a look at your website uniformkilo which has some great videos on it not least the trip to France with 13 of you last year.

If anyone is planning that sort of adventure and there is space for a "recently passed" PPL in the trip I would be more than up for it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James T Lowe
Moderator
Moderator


Offline
Joined: Jul 27, 2004
Posts: 2575
Location: Leicester


uk.gif

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations Mav! Beers all round, tonight then! Cheers! Cheers! Cheers!
_________________
J.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
MintedMav
'Torquing Regularly
'Torquing Regularly


Offline
Joined: Aug 24, 2010
Posts: 94
Location: Teddington, SW London, UK



PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks James - I went down the Champagne route instead... feeling the effects a bit this morning as a result.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DBChopper
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Apr 27, 2005
Posts: 518
Location: SE England


uk.gif

PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TOP result Mav - very well done!

Heli Boy
_________________
DBChopper

CPL(H) finally!
R22 R44
Redhill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HeliTorque Forum Index » Student Pilots & Hour Builders All times are GMT

 
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 5 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Sponsors


Billund Air Center

Visit HeliTorque!