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HeliTorque :: View topic - RT Oral Test - Diversion Procedures
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RT Oral Test - Diversion Procedures
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ExmoorHeli
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 10:10 am    Post subject: RT Oral Test - Diversion Procedures Reply with quote

Iíve got my RT practical test in a few days and I understand that part of the test involves a diversion to another airfield.

Iíve got examples for most of the procedures involved in the test, but none of my text books gives a specific example for diversions. Iíve done a search for ďdiversionĒ in CAP 413, Edition 18, but nothing comes up.

I am assuming there is probably some particular aspect of a diversion that they want to test you on otherwise it would not be included, but Iím guessing you request a frequency change to the alternative airfield and then pass your flight details in the usual way, giving the new airfield as your destination.

QUESTIONS:
1. Is there anything they particularly want to test you on, other than your ability to cope with the unusual situation?
2. Is there any recommended procedure which should be followed specific to a diversion?
3. Can anyone suggest a succinct way of explaining that you were intending to go to airfield A but you now wish to divert to airfield B due to bad weather/shortage of fuel/airfield closure or whatever reason they happen to give you? (This is where I usually start to waffle and confuse the person at the other end.)

Thanks in advance.
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3Blades
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there,

Im an instructor and RT examiner, so happy to help. What I am looking for during the RT practical test in relation to a diversion is primarily,

1. The candidate can make the decision to divert if appropriate. (think safety first)
2. The candidate can make the appropriate standard calls to the most suitable ATC unit.

I hope this answers your first question. In answer to your second, you will have had time to study the candidate brief and route chart prior to the test, so basically it is left up to you to decide the best route to your diversion aerodrome (direct if possible subject to airspace etc) and if you need to transit controlled airspace or a danger area, make the standard calls to the most appropriate unit for that area.

To answer your last question, I would suggest that you respond when asked to "pass your details" with "G-XXXX is a Cessna 172 (or whatever type) diverting from xxx to xxx due to closed runway/poor weather etc, request zone entry at xxx" or something similar. Remember, keep it simple! Use standard calls and give an ETA!!

Students can find the test daunting, but I find most are under-prepared.. I am glad to see you are doing your homework.. My tips for test day are to know all the standard calls as per CAP 413 (which is how it must be done during the test, no matter which way you having been doing RT prior to it) and TAKE YOUR TIME! I would much rather a candiate took a few minutes to think out each call and got it in the correct order than try to rush through it and miss things out.

Best of luck with the test!!

3B
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's vary helpful, thank you.

I wasn't sure how much freedom you have to vary your route. When I spoke to the Examiner a couple of weeks ago he said all the navigation is done for you, but from what you say 3Blades it sounds as if you are given a certain amount of choice.

I would be interested to know if the correct "pre-flight" planning using the material you are given is as important as what you actually say?
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

Sorry if I my reply was misleading, the navigation is done for you, if a diversion is required it will depend on the circumstances at the time when you actually decide to divert. For instance if you are joining the circuit and the runway is blocked (test is from FW perspective) you will be routing direct from your destination to your diversion aerodrome, however if you check the weather on route to your destination and it is clearly unsuitable, you may choose to divert before you reach your destination, the important thing to remember is you are not being tested on navigation, only on practical use of the RT and procedures.

It is very important that you are aware of the differences in ATC, FISO and A/G Radio and what services they can provide. It is also helpful if you have a good awareness of the different classes of airspace, e.g. class A, D, & G, and remember the new ATSOCAS services were introduced in March.

In relation to "pre flight planning" read the briefing notes carefully, and I advise my candidates to review the instructions during the test so that they do not miss any items. Take note of each of the aerodrome services and frequencies provided, you can find helpful notes adjacent to the frquencies in brackets. Lastly revise your books or CAP 413 on use of VDF and procedures on how to ask for a position fix, and most important of all, the emergency calls. Another of my tips is try to break the test down into 5 or 6 sections and tackle each one at a time which makes it seem less complex. The key to a good first time pass is a good understanding of the above procedures and careful pre-test planning.

3B
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again for that 3B.

I think I know enough theory, but my main worry is that I will be able to convert the theory into practice and not get thrown by something totally unexpected. Most of my flying experience has been in uncontrolled airspace with A/G. Still, I'm not going to get stressed, and if the worst happens I'll just treat the whole test as a practice run.

Steve.
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