Welcome Guest
HeliTorque
  
User Control Panel

Security Code: : Security Code
Type Security Code Here: :
 
Register Here
Lost Password?

Online Stats:
Visitors: 52
Members: 0
Total: 52

Membership:
New Today: 0
New Yesterday: 0
Registering: 0
Members: 6662
Latest: chrisw

Most Ever Online
Visitors: 447
Members: 10
Total: 457


HeliTorque :: View topic - training scenario
Forum FAQ
Forum FAQ
Search
Search
Memberlist
Memberlist
Usergroups
Usergroups
Profile
Profile
Contact Manager
Contact Manager
Log in
Log in
Log in to check your private messages
Log in to check your private messages
HeliTorque Forum Index » Ground School

Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT
training scenario
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Silverbusa
Shy 'Torquer
Shy 'Torquer


Offline
Joined: Jan 25, 2010
Posts: 1



PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:49 pm    Post subject: training scenario Reply with quote

A few months ago I started flying Helicopters. What a thrill, however now I realize there is a ton of info to know before a flight can even get the green light. I wanted some help with a particular problem presented in a training class. I was told there is no correct answer but this gives me an idea of what I need to be thinking about before a flight can proceed.

The scenario is as follows:

Helicopter is at point A and must determine if a flight can go over a mountain ridge to point B. Take off Point A is at 6000 ft MSL and go over a ridge top of 9500 Ft MSL to point B at 7000 ft MSL. The distance from A to B is 100 NM.

Helicopter--R22 Beta (max gross weight 1370lbs)
has aux. fuel tank
2 people 175 lbs each
Temp--26 degrees Cel.
29.92 Hg.
TC--090 degrees
Wind 160----14kts


This is everything given to me for the problem. With this info, what needs to be worked out to see if a safe flight can be performed? How is this to be worked out? Is everything with in limits?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
PilotWolf
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Sep 7, 2004
Posts: 1328
Location: Southern California.


blank.gif

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Start with the basics...

How much fuel can you take, based on the weigh of the pilot and passenger.Is the fuel sufficent for the trip (and diversion requirements) - think distance and time.

Will you start and end with the machine within CofG limits - given the fuel and pilot/passenger weights.

Think limits - in particular denisty altitude and the MP limits.

W.

PS I haven't worked it out just a few pointers where I would start Smile
_________________
In memory of Skippy the Dog - "www.pilotsnpaws.org"  - RIP Scruffy.x
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
haggishunter
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Feb 14, 2008
Posts: 888
Location: Stavanger, Norway


uk.gif

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I will give you a clue from what I have worked out... enroute density altitude is not a problem with regards to aircraft certification, but the MAP chart definately needs to be consulted as well as the performance and limitations sections of the flight manual!

HH
_________________
ATPL(H) IR(H): SK92, AS355, EC120, R22/44

"When the tough gets going, the tough eat haggis!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
WindSwept
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Sep 12, 2008
Posts: 500


uk.gif

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Think hypoxia lol thats what i would be thinking anyways.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Skype Name
PilotWolf
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Sep 7, 2004
Posts: 1328
Location: Southern California.


blank.gif

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HaggisHunter wrote:
Well I will give you a clue from what I have worked out... enroute density altitude is not a problem with regards to aircraft certification, but the MAP chart definately needs to be consulted as well as the performance and limitations sections of the flight manual!

HH


Ah, I don't have the POH handy..

Windswept wrote:
Think hypoxia lol thats what i would be thinking anyways.


Potentially a risk but in the US, (guessing that where Silverbusa maybe as nothing that high in the UK Smile) oxygen only required 10000 feet to feet MSL for parts of flight longer than 30 minutes at that altitude or above 12000 feet MSL.

Quite a few other practical aspects I would be considering too but not appropriate to answering the question with the info given.

W.
_________________
In memory of Skippy the Dog - "www.pilotsnpaws.org"  - RIP Scruffy.x
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
WindSwept
H Addict
H Addict


Offline
Joined: Sep 12, 2008
Posts: 500


uk.gif

PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yea i figured it wouldn't be that obvious. Ive stood at 12000+ ft on a mountain in the alps and didn't really notice. Although i had been at the resort for nearly a week and was probably used to it by then.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Skype Name
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HeliTorque Forum Index » Ground School All times are GMT

 
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Sponsors


Billund Air Center

Visit HeliTorque!