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HeliTorque :: View topic - PPL(H) Diary.. 2/January/2011
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HeliTorque Forum Index » Student Pilots & Hour Builders

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PPL(H) Diary.. 2/January/2011 Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
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Echo-India
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well done Smile How many hours have you done so far?

I don't think calling for start is mandatory, its down to the rules of the individual aerodrome. At Swansea we have to request for rotor start due to the volume of parachuting that goes on there.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EI

I am making quite a few assumptions here, but I am a bit bemused by some of your more recent posts.

If as you say on the previous page the IAA abide by SFAR 73 and in its current state it requires 20 hours of R44 time before you can solo the magic 20 is a bit more than a couple of circuits and a touch on VRS away.

I am also a bit concerned that if
Quote:
At one point, the rain hitting the amount of rain hitting windscreen almost cut the vis to 0 (may be a bit of an exaggeration, making it sound unsafe - but we had GPS, nearly no traffic and FIS, sorted.
is true, that the zero vis (even as an exageration) is a bit worrying, as is the assumption that having a GPS !! is going to make it better.

If an FIS in Southern Ireland is equivalent to an FIS we used to have over here, it does not mean that the controller is obliged to provide any seperation or warning about the other traffic, if its not equivalent then it may or may nor help.

Yes I am the forum killjoy sometimes, hey ho.

Based upon my interpretation of what you have said here, I hope your instructor knows what he or she is doing.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am glad Veeany posted that - I read it and thought the same but being tactful for a change I didn't post! I am surprised that someone else Wink hasn't posted but maybe he's working...

Do a search here as there is a thread where a low time pilot was put in a similar but unfortunately far more serious situation by an instructor flying, with a student, in totally unsuitable weather. Having an inside understanding of what happened she is lucky to be alive and her actions as a low time student probably had a significant bearing on the outcome. Had I or (several other forum members) been there at the time we would probably laid the instructor out cold!

We weren't there on your flight so only have your description of the weather. But consider what would have happened if the GPS had failed? VFR - see and avoid... could you seriously have seen another aircraft in time to avoid it?

Out of interest being as the SFAR 73 is a USA FAA regulation does it apply outside of the USA?

W.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PW

I [sadly] looked at this in detail a few years ago, and whilst the wording may have changed (I don't think it has significantly) the SFAR applies to FAA licensed pilots (including students being taught under the FAA regs).

Some national authorities have decided to adopt the SFAR minima into their training regulations, indeed there was a 'suggestion' from EASA about 12 months ago that all JAA countries should do so.

The UK decided not to, mainly due to the differences between training required under JAA and FAA systems and the fact that our training syllabi already includes what is specified in SFAR73 which was not required to be taught in the FAA system until its introduction with the SFAR.

If you are bored you can read some more here http://www.griffin-helicopters.co.uk/note/sfar73.asp

SFAR73 aside, in the UK the R22 and R44 are the only single engine types that are specifically precluded from having a shortened Type Rating course and must take 5 hours as a minimum, regardless of having flown the other previously.

GS
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

veeany wrote:
PW

I [sadly] looked at this in detail a few years ago, and whilst the wording may have changed (I don't think it has significantly) the SFAR applies to FAA licensed pilots (including students being taught under the FAA regs).

GS
(My bold - PW)

Yes, that is a better way of putting as obviously FAA pilots and aircraft fly outside the USA!

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PW,

I've been on holiday, and 'biting my tongue' since.

I'm amazed this industry just doesn't learn Crying or Very sad

EI,
I'm probably making some similar assumptions to Vee............ and my 'subtlety gene' is also marginally weaker than his - so my apologies.

But I reckon both you and your instructor POSSIBLY need a slap.

How about some food for thought................

What altitude were you flying at?

Your first outing in a new aircraft type, yet on a day as you describe. Sensible?

There is a reason PPL lessons go in a structured order and autos aren't at the front of the list. See my point above- Sensible? Best value first R44 lesson for you?

Flight planning begins well before you drive to the airfield and is a 'fluid' process - I suggest you read your Met book.

Which sort of weather front was passing? Did flight planning get that far?

Some bits to get you thinking:
Warm front - lowering stratiform clouds, increasing rain, with the possibility of POOR vis and FOG, a falling pressure thats slows or stops, a wind that veers, a temperature that rises.

Cold front- Cumuliform cloud (cumulus/cumulonimbus), a sudden drop in temperature and a lower dewpoint temperature, veering wind, falling pressure that rises once the front has past.

Or did you have an occluded front? Its not unusual for these to have cumuliform cloud as well as stratiform cloud. And sometimes the stratiform cloud can conceal thunderstorm activity.

So why as pilots are we wary of Cumulonimbus (Cb) clouds?

Some clues- Cb's and Thunderstorms IMPLY moderate/severe ICE and TURBULENCE. Updrafts can be in excess of 5,000 ft/min and downdrafts can be even higher still. You could experience loss of airspeed, flight path deviations, handling problems, and possibly structural damage.

Is an R44 certificated for flight in icing conditions?
What is an R44s normal rate of climb and do you reckon its maximum rate of climb is in excess of 5000 ft/min?

On that basis- Is flying in horrible weather 'quite fun'? Is flying beneath the frontal cloud in poor visibility to 'see how the R44 handles turbulence' very sensible?

Is this stuff to feel 'pumped' about? Confused

I see a pass in HP+L. So you've read about the inner ear and somatogravic inputs? You understand how easy disorientation can occur. You understand that if you are stupid enough to lose visual references due to poor weather you MUST rely upon your aircraft instruments............. So how much value was there in flying to 'feel' the aircraft attitudes in poor weather?

If you are flying out of trim do all your pressure sensitive gauges display correct readings?

Maybe you have overexaggerated the flight report. In any case flying in horrible weather is NOT fun, it requires far more work than good weather flying and a more finely tuned sense of airmanship. Your report doesn't indicate much of those thought processes.

As a sub 20hr pilot is poor weather a wise place to be, even with an instructor? Did you get as much value from your lesson as you could have? You are training to fly VFR - basically clear of cloud and in sight of the ground (yes rule 5 has the other bit too, but keeping things simple for a second), your primary attitude reference being the horizon. Was that clearly in view throughout your flight?

GPS is not a primary source of navigation. It sounds as if you'd not have felt so comfortable had the GPS not been fitted or working?


FWIW I don't think your potential tail strike (where an Instructor should have ensured, prior to allowing you to turn, that airmanship had been completed) was the only stupid thing you did that day Sad (assuming my reading of your account is correct). If it gets things into perspective I still always, without fail, ensure the tail is clear before spot turning.

I wouldn't be boasting about your last trip.
Please don't become a statistic.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite frankly to fly in those conditions is stupid, the student learns next to nothing, the only benefit is to the training companies bank account
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

See I am mellowing !
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can I have some of what you are taking then?
On second thoughts................ Very Happy

Lets see if you're as mellow in two months Wink
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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we did have an AI, and with the IFR experiance my instructor no doubt has - mixed with my basic understanding from flight sim - and knowing which way the front was facing - we would of been able to fly out of it if the worst had happened


Please change my earlier possibly to a definately Sad

Does your FI hold an instrument rating? Have they ever held one? If the answer is no then they'll most likely have 5hrs of Sim IMC from their PPL, and then an additional 15 Sim IMC from their CPL. Add in a couple of hours on the FI course and the grand total may be 25 hours of actual Sim IMC flying. So marginally more than your total hours. Furthermore Sim IMC is totally different to actual IMC. As a final point a full initial Instrument rating is 45 hrs Sim and 10 hrs in a 'screened' aircraft (as a minimum course), compare those figures again. Newly qualified with an IR is still no place to be flying IFR single pilot - unless you have significant other experience. Its too easy to get overloaded and make fatal mistakes for the unwary.

The attitude of your quote, if unchanged, will most likely see you in to an early grave. Crying or Very sad

I meant first lesson in the R44 a new type, not your first ever flying lesson. The R44 will handle differently hence the type rating training.
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